ecological farming and old fashioned living in southwest ohio

Winter Recipes

Coming soon…

Braised Kale with White Beans and Smoked Ham

Posted by on June 5, 2014 in Fall recipes, real food, recipes, Spring recipes, Summer recipes, Winter recipes | 0 comments

  Braised Kale with White Beans and Smoked Ham 2014-06-05 06:54:58 An earthy, smoky dish that can be served as a side or a main course. Write a review Save Recipe Print Ingredients 1 pound kale 1 can canellini beans 2 tsp extra virgin olive oil 2 cloves garlic 4 oz smoked ham, diced 1/2 cup chicken broth sea salt and freshly ground pepper 1/2 tsp fresh rosemary Instructions Strip the stalks and ribs from the kale leaves and discard, then tear the leaves into 2 inch pieces. Drain the beans, rinse them, and drain again. (Or, we suggest soaking dried beans overnight to deactivate the phytic acid.) In a frying pan over medium heat, warm the oil. When the oil is hot, add the garlic and sauté until lightly browned, about 1 minute. Add the ham and sauté for 1 minute longer. Add the kale, cover the pan, and cook, turning occasionally, until the kale leaves just begin to wilt, 2-3 minutes. Add the broth and a pinch of salt and pepper and cook until the leaves are just tender and the liquid has almost evaporated, 4-5 minutes. Add the beans and rosemary to the pan and raise the heat to medium high. Cook, tossing gently, until the beans are heated through, 2-3 minutes. Taste and adjust the seasonings and serve right away. By Elizabeth H. Finn Meadows Farm...

read more

A Fragrant Feast

Posted by on October 24, 2013 in carrots, fall crops, Fall recipes, gardening, growing food, organic, recipes, Spring recipes, Summer recipes, Winter recipes | 0 comments

A Fragrant Feast

    It’s late October.  We harvest in anticipation of the first hard freeze of the season, seemingly early if the past few years are any indication.  Cabbage, kale, spinach, lettuce, beets…and then just a few steps to the left, a sweet aroma tempts us closer.  What could possibly smell so sweet in the garden?  It’s the fall carrots  (daucus carota):  their ambrosial scent makes our mouths water and their hypnotizing fragrance lures us to their loamy home.  The one vegetable we really don’t mind harvesting this time of year, these carrots not only entice our senses, the process of digging them warms us up.  We here at Finn Meadows suffered a huge carrot loss back in July, but you know what?  The carrot gods have redeemed themselves this fall. (For tips on growing carrots, scroll down.) A few facts for you… 1) Carrots taste best in spring and fall.  Why?   Because, according to Mad Food Science: “Carrots stockpile sugar in the taproot because it acts as a tasty antifreeze. With all those glucose molecules mixed in with the water molecules in the carrot cells, the water can’t freeze. The colder it gets, the more sugar the carrot stockpiles, and the sweeter and more delicious it becomes.”  The best tasting carrots are fresh, local, and picked after frost.  Their sweetness even holds up in soups. 2) If you can’t find fresh carrots at the market, buy them organic at the store.  In the Environmental Working Group’s analysis of vegetables with the highest pesticide residue, carrots rank 23 out of 51.  I have heard that in testing glyphosate (aka Roundup) on crops, carrots are often used.  If carrots survive, then so will whatever else they are testing.  (I have only heard this, and have yet to find a source…working on it)  Also, in 2013, the EPA raised the level of glyphosate allowed in carrots and sweet potatoes. 3) When grown in clay soil, carrots grow all funky – they might grow two fingers that wrap around each other (we call this carrot love), or they might grow five fingers and look like a hand.  Carrots will grow straight down in loose soil – but here in the Midwest the soil is full of clay.  If the carrot hits a compacted section or a rock, it has to adjust it’s growth. 4) It’s best to store carrots by cutting the tops off.  The greens actually pull moisture from the root of the vegetable.  They look beautiful when sold with their tops on, but when you take them home, cut off the tops for a crisp carrot that lasts longer in your refrigerator. 5) Queen Anne’s Lace is actually a wild carrot.  Unfortunately, by the time it flowers and is easily identified (carrots are biennial – meaning they flower in year 2), it’s root has become tough, woody, and not very edible.  In the first year of Queen Anne’s Lace life, when it is most edible, it can often be confused with wild hemlock which is poisonous to humans – so be careful! 6) A bit of fun history – Did you know all carrots used to be purple or yellow?  The earliest trace of carrots were found in Iran and Afghanistan, and later cultivated in Holland to become the orange carrots...

read more

Finn Meadows Farm participates in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.