ecological farming and old fashioned living in southwest ohio

Summer Recipes

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Tomato Tarte Tatin

Posted by on July 16, 2014 in Summer recipes | 0 comments

Tomato Tarte Tatin 2014-07-16 14:34:43 caramelized tomatoes on puff pastry Write a review Save Recipe Print Ingredients All-purpose flour 1 (half 17.3-ounce package) frozen sheet puff pastry, thawed somewhat 1 tablespoon(s) olive oil 1 medium (8- to 10-ounce) onion, chopped 1 large (8- to 10-ounce) yellow or green pepper, chopped Salt Pepper 1 teaspoon(s) chopped fresh thyme leaves 2 tablespoon(s) butter (no substitutions) 2 tablespoon(s) sugar (I used sucanet) 1 1/2 pound(s) firm ripe plum tomatoes, seeded, cut in half lengthwise (I used the cherry tomato principe bourghese, but a roma or paste would be fine) 3 ounce(s) goat cheese, crumbled or a fresh mozzarella 8 small fresh basil leaves Instructions 1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. 2. On lightly floured surface, with floured rolling pin, roll pastry into 12 inch square; cut into 12 inch round. Place on waxed paper-lined cookie sheet; refrigerate. (I used a 12” square cast iron skillet and didn’t have to cut the pastry.) 3. In 12-inch heavy ovenproof skillet, heat oil on medium. Add onion, yellow pepper, and 1/8 teaspoon each salt and freshly ground black pepper. Cook 6 minutes or just until tender, stirring. Stir in thyme; cook 1 minute. Transfer to bowl. 4. To same pan, add butter and sugar; cook 1 to 2 minutes or until both melt, stirring. Add tomatoes, cut sides down, in single layer; cover, cook 2 minutes, then uncover. Cook 3 to 4 minutes longer or until most of pan juices are reduced and thickened, swirling pan frequently. Turn tomatoes over; sprinkle with 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/8 teaspoon pepper. Cook 2 minutes or until softened and most of liquid has evaporated, swirling pan frequently. (Any remaining liquid should be thick and glossy.) 5. Remove pan from heat. Sprinkle onion mixture over and between tomatoes. Carefully invert dough (still on waxed paper) onto mixture in pan; discard paper. Cut six small slits in top of dough. Bake 30 to 35 minutes or until crust is dark golden brown. Cool in pan on wire rack 10 minutes. 6. To unmold, place platter over top of tart. Quickly and carefully turn platter with skillet upside down to invert tart; remove skillet. Sprinkle tart with 1/8 teaspoon salt, goat cheese, and basil. Serve immediate By Submitted by Sally G. Adapted from Good Housekeeping Adapted from Good Housekeeping Finn Meadows Farm...

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Braised Kale with White Beans and Smoked Ham

Posted by on June 5, 2014 in Fall recipes, real food, recipes, Spring recipes, Summer recipes, Winter recipes | 0 comments

  Braised Kale with White Beans and Smoked Ham 2014-06-05 06:54:58 An earthy, smoky dish that can be served as a side or a main course. Write a review Save Recipe Print Ingredients 1 pound kale 1 can canellini beans 2 tsp extra virgin olive oil 2 cloves garlic 4 oz smoked ham, diced 1/2 cup chicken broth sea salt and freshly ground pepper 1/2 tsp fresh rosemary Instructions Strip the stalks and ribs from the kale leaves and discard, then tear the leaves into 2 inch pieces. Drain the beans, rinse them, and drain again. (Or, we suggest soaking dried beans overnight to deactivate the phytic acid.) In a frying pan over medium heat, warm the oil. When the oil is hot, add the garlic and sauté until lightly browned, about 1 minute. Add the ham and sauté for 1 minute longer. Add the kale, cover the pan, and cook, turning occasionally, until the kale leaves just begin to wilt, 2-3 minutes. Add the broth and a pinch of salt and pepper and cook until the leaves are just tender and the liquid has almost evaporated, 4-5 minutes. Add the beans and rosemary to the pan and raise the heat to medium high. Cook, tossing gently, until the beans are heated through, 2-3 minutes. Taste and adjust the seasonings and serve right away. By Elizabeth H. Finn Meadows Farm...

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A Fragrant Feast

Posted by on October 24, 2013 in carrots, fall crops, Fall recipes, gardening, growing food, organic, recipes, Spring recipes, Summer recipes, Winter recipes | 0 comments

A Fragrant Feast

    It’s late October.  We harvest in anticipation of the first hard freeze of the season, seemingly early if the past few years are any indication.  Cabbage, kale, spinach, lettuce, beets…and then just a few steps to the left, a sweet aroma tempts us closer.  What could possibly smell so sweet in the garden?  It’s the fall carrots  (daucus carota):  their ambrosial scent makes our mouths water and their hypnotizing fragrance lures us to their loamy home.  The one vegetable we really don’t mind harvesting this time of year, these carrots not only entice our senses, the process of digging them warms us up.  We here at Finn Meadows suffered a huge carrot loss back in July, but you know what?  The carrot gods have redeemed themselves this fall. (For tips on growing carrots, scroll down.) A few facts for you… 1) Carrots taste best in spring and fall.  Why?   Because, according to Mad Food Science: “Carrots stockpile sugar in the taproot because it acts as a tasty antifreeze. With all those glucose molecules mixed in with the water molecules in the carrot cells, the water can’t freeze. The colder it gets, the more sugar the carrot stockpiles, and the sweeter and more delicious it becomes.”  The best tasting carrots are fresh, local, and picked after frost.  Their sweetness even holds up in soups. 2) If you can’t find fresh carrots at the market, buy them organic at the store.  In the Environmental Working Group’s analysis of vegetables with the highest pesticide residue, carrots rank 23 out of 51.  I have heard that in testing glyphosate (aka Roundup) on crops, carrots are often used.  If carrots survive, then so will whatever else they are testing.  (I have only heard this, and have yet to find a source…working on it)  Also, in 2013, the EPA raised the level of glyphosate allowed in carrots and sweet potatoes. 3) When grown in clay soil, carrots grow all funky – they might grow two fingers that wrap around each other (we call this carrot love), or they might grow five fingers and look like a hand.  Carrots will grow straight down in loose soil – but here in the Midwest the soil is full of clay.  If the carrot hits a compacted section or a rock, it has to adjust it’s growth. 4) It’s best to store carrots by cutting the tops off.  The greens actually pull moisture from the root of the vegetable.  They look beautiful when sold with their tops on, but when you take them home, cut off the tops for a crisp carrot that lasts longer in your refrigerator. 5) Queen Anne’s Lace is actually a wild carrot.  Unfortunately, by the time it flowers and is easily identified (carrots are biennial – meaning they flower in year 2), it’s root has become tough, woody, and not very edible.  In the first year of Queen Anne’s Lace life, when it is most edible, it can often be confused with wild hemlock which is poisonous to humans – so be careful! 6) A bit of fun history – Did you know all carrots used to be purple or yellow?  The earliest trace of carrots were found in Iran and Afghanistan, and later cultivated in Holland to become the orange carrots...

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That Vegetable Looks Weird…Is it Safe to Eat?

Posted by on September 17, 2013 in beans, freezing, heirloom, recipes, Summer recipes, weird looking vegetables | 2 comments

That Vegetable Looks Weird…Is it Safe to Eat?

I’ll be honest.  We ran out of regular green bean seeds when we needed them most.  But we were able to use a delicious substitution: dragon langerie beans, aka dragon tongue beans (side note: every time I am picking these beans I think of a giant purple dragon dancing around in lingerie; at least it keeps me entertained for the hours spent picking).  Dragon tongue beans are beautiful white, flat beans with purple specks.  You can use them just like regular green beans.  They are actually sweeter than green beans, and I like them better.  You don’t even have to string them. The easiest way to cook them, and our favorite, is a quick saute.  Sauteed Beans 1 medium onion, diced 1 large handful beans (cut off the little stems at the top if you like, but Marc and I just cut them off on our plate) 2 tbsp butter salt and pepper to taste Melt the butter in your skillet over medium heat.  Put the diced onion in the skillet and let the onions become slightly brown.  Add in your beans, saute for 2 minutes.  The beans should still be crispy.  Add salt and pepper. _______________________________ This is the easiest dinner on earth.  We’ve been eating it a lot lately.  You can do it with any bean that is for fresh eating. Also, freezing produce is a great way to still have local food when it’s out of season.  Beans are one of the easiest things to do.  Most recommend blanching beans first, but I have heard that you can put them straight into your freezer just fine.  A little trick for freezing produce though: lay them out on a cookie sheet so they freeze separately.  Then put them in the ziplock bag.  This way you can take out however much you like without having to cook the entire bag full, because they have all frozen together. I don’t mean to be preachy here, but hey everyone – there are thousands of varieties of vegetables!  I don’t even know a good majority of them.  But they look funny and they’re not green, or perfectly round, or don’t look at all like something that comes from the grocery store.  Not everything that comes out of a garden is perfect or what you might consider to be “normal”.  In fact it probably tastes way better than what comes out of the grocery store, as most of our food does…because a) it is the freshest food you can get and b) we grow heirloom varieties that were saved for their flavor, not their looks.  (Though I happen to think that these beans are way prettier than standard green beans.)  Try these gems, and you’ll see!  We encourage you to be a little adventurous with us – your kids might like the way these beans look.  Also, if you are ever in doubt, please feel free to eat one in our shop.  Sampling is...

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