ecological farming and old fashioned living in southwest ohio

Fall Recipes

Coming soon…
 
They’s something kindo’ harty-like about the atmusfere
When the heat of summer’s over and the coolin’ fall is here—
Of course we miss the flowers, and the blossums on the trees,
And the mumble of the hummin’-birds and buzzin’ of the bees;
But the air’s so appetizin’; and the landscape through the haze
Of a crisp and sunny morning of the airly autumn days
Is a pictur’ that no painter has the colorin’ to mock—
When the frost is on the punkin and the fodder’s in the shock.
 
-from When The Frost is On the Punkin by James Whitcomb Riley

Quick Braised Cabbage and Apple

Posted by on October 9, 2014 in Fall recipes, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Quick Braised Cabbage and Apple

  Quick Braised Cabbage and Apple 2014-10-09 19:53:11 A quick and healthful Germanic dish Write a review Save Recipe Print Ingredients 1 clove garlic, smashed 3 tbsp unsalted butter 2 pounds cabbage cut into 1 1/2 inch pieces 1 mild, sweet apple such as Gala or Fiji (we used Northern Spy), cut into 1/2 inch cubes 1/2 cup unfiltered apple cider 1/2 tsp caraway seeds 2 pinches allspice 1 1/2 tbsp apple cider vinegar salt and pepper Instructions Cook garlic in butter in a 12-inch heavy skillet over medium heat, stirring, 1 minute. Add cabbage, apple, cider, caraway, allspice, 1 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon pepper and cook, covered, stirring occasionally, until cabbage is tender, 15 to 18 minutes. Add vinegar and cook, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until liquid has evaporated, 2 to 3 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Notes Red cabbage makes this dish even more delicious, but I use green if we don't have any red. By submitted by Marsha L Finn Meadows Farm...

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Corn Cake Stacks with Aged Cheddar and Arugula

Posted by on July 16, 2014 in Fall recipes | 1 comment

Corn Cake Stacks with Aged Cheddar and Arugula

Corn Cake Stacks with Aged Cheddar and Arugula 2014-07-16 13:53:09 Serves 4 Write a review Save Recipe Print Ingredients 2 cups corn kernels, fresh (from about 2 ears) or frozen and thawed 1/4 cup finely diced red bell pepper 2 T cornmeal 1 tsp sugar 3/4 tsp kosher salt 1/4 tsp baking powder 2 large eggs, separated 4 T olive oil 1 1/2 cups shredded aged Cheddar cheese (6 ounces) 2 cups baby arugula Instructions Preheat the oven to 350 In a large bowl, stir together the corn, bell pepper, cornmeal, sugar, salt, making powder and egg yolks. In a separate bowl, with an electric mixer, beat the egg whites to stiff peaks. Fold the egg whites into the corn mixture. In a large skillet, heat 2 T of the oil over medium heat. Working in batches, drop half the batter by scant 1/4 cup mounds into the oil, flattening them slightly with a spatula, and cook for 2 minutes per side, or until golden brown. Transfer to a baking sheet and repeat with the remaining batter and 2 T oil. Divide the Cheddar amount the corn cakes and bake for 1 minute, just until the cheese has melted. Remove from the oven, top each with some of the arugula, and then stack 3 together making a total of 4 stacks. Serve immediately. By Submitted by Ruth E. Finn Meadows Farm...

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Curried Carrot-Kohlrabi Fritters

Posted by on July 16, 2014 in Fall recipes, Spring recipes | 0 comments

Curried Carrot-Kohlrabi Fritters 2014-07-16 13:30:47 What's better than vegetable fritters with a yogurt topping? Write a review Save Recipe Print Ingredients 1 kohlrabi bulb, peeled 1 large carrot, peeled 2 green onions, whites and greens thinly sliced 1 large egg, lightly beaten 1 teaspoon salt 1⁄2 teaspoon pepper 1 tablespoon yellow curry powder 1⁄2 cup all-purpose flour 1⁄2 teaspoon baking powder About 1⁄2 cup butter Instructions Using the large holes on a box grater, grate your kohlrabi. Gather up the pieces between layers of paper towel or a clean dish towel and squeeze to remove as much access liquid as possible. Place in a bowl and repeat the process with the grated carrot. (Warning: It may stain your dishtowels if you go that route.) To the carrot and kohlrabi add the sliced onions, egg, salt, pepper, flour and baking powder and toss gently until thoroughly combined. Heat butter in a large, heavy-bottomed skillet. Scoop about 1⁄4 cup portions of the fritter mixture and gently flatten between your hands (the mixture will be sticky, but this part does not have to look pretty. You can flatten them in the pan, but be careful because they tend to splatter a bit.) Add to the hot oil and cook until golden, about 3 minutes on each side. Remove to a cooling rack or a plate lined with towels to absorb the excess oil. Top with yogurt-herb sauce (below) and serve warm or at room temperature. For topping 1⁄2 cup low-fat Greek yogurt 2 tablespoons light sour cream 1 tablespoon chopped dill 1 tablespoon chopped parsley The juice from one half lemon Salt, pepper Mix all of these things together. Top your fritters and enjoy! Finn Meadows Farm...

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Buttered Kohlrabi

Posted by on June 19, 2014 in Fall recipes, Spring recipes, Uncategorized | 1 comment

This is from “The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Vegetable Cookbook”.  They brown very well and look like french fries. Buttered Kohlrabi 2014-06-19 15:26:24 Write a review Save Recipe Print Ingredients 1 1/2 pounds kohlrabi 3 tablespoons unsalted butter 3/4 tsp kosher salt 3/4 water Instructions Place the kohlrabi in a large skillet along with the butter, salt and water. Bring to a boil over high heat, reduce to low, cover and simmer for 10 minutes. Uncover and cook for 5 minutes, or until the water is evaporated and the kohlrabi is tender and coated with butter, serve hot. By Ruth E. Adapted from The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Vegetable Cookbook Adapted from The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Vegetable Cookbook Finn Meadows Farm...

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Braised Kale with White Beans and Smoked Ham

Posted by on June 5, 2014 in Fall recipes, real food, recipes, Spring recipes, Summer recipes, Winter recipes | 0 comments

  Braised Kale with White Beans and Smoked Ham 2014-06-05 06:54:58 An earthy, smoky dish that can be served as a side or a main course. Write a review Save Recipe Print Ingredients 1 pound kale 1 can canellini beans 2 tsp extra virgin olive oil 2 cloves garlic 4 oz smoked ham, diced 1/2 cup chicken broth sea salt and freshly ground pepper 1/2 tsp fresh rosemary Instructions Strip the stalks and ribs from the kale leaves and discard, then tear the leaves into 2 inch pieces. Drain the beans, rinse them, and drain again. (Or, we suggest soaking dried beans overnight to deactivate the phytic acid.) In a frying pan over medium heat, warm the oil. When the oil is hot, add the garlic and sauté until lightly browned, about 1 minute. Add the ham and sauté for 1 minute longer. Add the kale, cover the pan, and cook, turning occasionally, until the kale leaves just begin to wilt, 2-3 minutes. Add the broth and a pinch of salt and pepper and cook until the leaves are just tender and the liquid has almost evaporated, 4-5 minutes. Add the beans and rosemary to the pan and raise the heat to medium high. Cook, tossing gently, until the beans are heated through, 2-3 minutes. Taste and adjust the seasonings and serve right away. By Elizabeth H. Finn Meadows Farm...

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All About Radishes

Posted by on May 15, 2014 in Fall recipes, Spring recipes, Uncategorized | 3 comments

All About Radishes

Before I became a farmer, I had no idea how much the weather would affect me on a daily basis.  I mean, I knew the weather was a huge part of life as a farmer, but still could not have fathomed how much it matters in terms of success and failure.  This spring has been one of the coldest on record, and subsequently, a huge challenge for us as gardeners.  I enjoy spring as a human being – the blooms, green coming back into the world, all the baby animals.  But as a farmer I hate it.  It’s a very challenging time to grow crops – at least here in Cincinnati when weather is so unpredictable! We could experience an extremely hot spell which causes all our arugula and asian greens to bolt (send up a flower, which changes the flavor) before it’s even been harvested, or a flooding rain that drowns all of our potatoes.  Both have happened this year.  Just this week it was 85 and humid on Monday and Tuesday, and now it’s not even 60 with lows getting into the mid-40s for the next few days.  I even listened to the advice of some other local farmers and started our cabbage and broccoli earlier this year thinking that we could get it in the garden early and harvest it in time to replant that space to winter squash.  But we weren’t able to get it in early, and are suffering the consequences (but we do have space for our winter squash since the potatoes didn’t make it – the silver lining!).  Anyway, all this to say – Marc and I are rethinking our gardening methods and hope to find a more permaculture-minded model for our farm.  We don’t mean to complain about how things are, but just hope to express to you that farming is HARD and often events happen that are out of our control.  But when things are going well, which is a lot of the time, it can be so joyful and rewarding.  We don’t give up just because we lose a crop, we just keep on trucking and try something new.  Farming can be very frustrating and is certainly not for the feint of heart. One vegetable we can always rely on are radishes.  They are the easiest vegetable you can grow.  Not only do they germinate very easily, but they are ready in about 30 days! Growing Tips You can grow radishes outdoors in Cincinnati from March through October, but they prefer the cooler weather of spring and fall.  Often in warmer temperatures they are prone to damage from flea beetles (you’ll see tiny holes in the leaves).  When you plant them, put them 3/4-1″ apart, and about 1/2″ deep.  The rows should be 10-12″ apart.  Keep them free of weeds, and the radishes will be ready in 3-4 weeks.  Some people even seed radishes on top of their carrots so they know where to looks for their carrot rows.  Carrots take such a long time to germinate, but radishes are up with the snap of your finger.  Health Benefits Radishes are high in Vitamin C.  They are also a natural diuretic, which can help to purify your urinary system.  If you’re looking for a way to detox, add radishes...

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Why You Should Make Your Own Salad Dressing

Posted by on April 20, 2014 in Fall recipes, recipes, Spring recipes | 7 comments

Why You Should Make Your Own Salad Dressing

Spring greens are in full swing here in Ohio. It can sometimes be a little overwhelming – how can you possibly eat that many greens? Luckily there is a huge variety to choose from right now at the farm – we have crisp lettuce, peppery arugula, addictive asian greens, mild spinach. Then there’s the swiss chard and the baby kale. When in doubt as to how you can spice up your salad, just add some extra vegetables, fruit, and some crunchy nuts or seeds. And don’t forget about a fabulous dressing. Salad dressings are so easy to make and take little time. You have much more control over what you’re eating. Have you ever looked at the label on store-bought salad dressing? The first ingredient on the list in vinaigrettes is usually canola oil, which is genetically modified if the dressing does not have an organic label on it. Not only is there a problem with the seed itself, but during the pressing of canola oil “the omega 3 fatty acids are transformed into trans fatty acids, similar to those in margarine.*”  The second ingredient is sugar (or high fructose corn syrup), which is most likely also genetically modified as most non-organic sugar is a combination of cane sugar and sugar from GM sugar beets. Next on the list is vinegar, and if it doesn’t specify what kind of vinegar, it is probably referring to white vinegar. Guess what? Also genetically modified, because it is made from fermented GM corn. Then there are usually a variety of spices listed, and lastly there are a bunch of preservatives. Not exactly what you might think of as healthy. Michael Ruhlman, one of my favorite chef-authors, offers an easy way for us to think about cooking – through ratios.  In his fantastic book Ratio, the ratio for vinaigrette is 3 parts oil to 1 part vinegar.  That’s the basic recipe and then you can add your own spices and flavors to create your own dressing.  So, here’s my go-to salad dressing. I like to pair it with roasted beets, orange slices, and goat cheese, but it’s really delicious on anything! Do you make your own salad dressings? What are your favorites? *from Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon p. 19.  Earlier in the book, Fallon cites a study that links margarine to chronic high levels of cholesterol, heart disease and cancer. Creamy Mustard Vinaigrette 2014-04-20 20:26:17 Write a review Save Recipe Print Prep Time 5 min Prep Time 5 min Ingredients 1/2 cup olive oil 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 1 shallot, minced (about the size of a head of garlic) 2 tablespoons yogurt 1 tablespoon whole grain mustard pinch each salt and pepper Instructions Place all ingredients in a mason jar. Shake until fully combined. Store in the refrigerator. Finn Meadows Farm...

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A Fragrant Feast

Posted by on October 24, 2013 in carrots, fall crops, Fall recipes, gardening, growing food, organic, recipes, Spring recipes, Summer recipes, Winter recipes | 0 comments

A Fragrant Feast

    It’s late October.  We harvest in anticipation of the first hard freeze of the season, seemingly early if the past few years are any indication.  Cabbage, kale, spinach, lettuce, beets…and then just a few steps to the left, a sweet aroma tempts us closer.  What could possibly smell so sweet in the garden?  It’s the fall carrots  (daucus carota):  their ambrosial scent makes our mouths water and their hypnotizing fragrance lures us to their loamy home.  The one vegetable we really don’t mind harvesting this time of year, these carrots not only entice our senses, the process of digging them warms us up.  We here at Finn Meadows suffered a huge carrot loss back in July, but you know what?  The carrot gods have redeemed themselves this fall. (For tips on growing carrots, scroll down.) A few facts for you… 1) Carrots taste best in spring and fall.  Why?   Because, according to Mad Food Science: “Carrots stockpile sugar in the taproot because it acts as a tasty antifreeze. With all those glucose molecules mixed in with the water molecules in the carrot cells, the water can’t freeze. The colder it gets, the more sugar the carrot stockpiles, and the sweeter and more delicious it becomes.”  The best tasting carrots are fresh, local, and picked after frost.  Their sweetness even holds up in soups. 2) If you can’t find fresh carrots at the market, buy them organic at the store.  In the Environmental Working Group’s analysis of vegetables with the highest pesticide residue, carrots rank 23 out of 51.  I have heard that in testing glyphosate (aka Roundup) on crops, carrots are often used.  If carrots survive, then so will whatever else they are testing.  (I have only heard this, and have yet to find a source…working on it)  Also, in 2013, the EPA raised the level of glyphosate allowed in carrots and sweet potatoes. 3) When grown in clay soil, carrots grow all funky – they might grow two fingers that wrap around each other (we call this carrot love), or they might grow five fingers and look like a hand.  Carrots will grow straight down in loose soil – but here in the Midwest the soil is full of clay.  If the carrot hits a compacted section or a rock, it has to adjust it’s growth. 4) It’s best to store carrots by cutting the tops off.  The greens actually pull moisture from the root of the vegetable.  They look beautiful when sold with their tops on, but when you take them home, cut off the tops for a crisp carrot that lasts longer in your refrigerator. 5) Queen Anne’s Lace is actually a wild carrot.  Unfortunately, by the time it flowers and is easily identified (carrots are biennial – meaning they flower in year 2), it’s root has become tough, woody, and not very edible.  In the first year of Queen Anne’s Lace life, when it is most edible, it can often be confused with wild hemlock which is poisonous to humans – so be careful! 6) A bit of fun history – Did you know all carrots used to be purple or yellow?  The earliest trace of carrots were found in Iran and Afghanistan, and later cultivated in Holland to become the orange carrots...

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Fall Vegetable Favorites

Posted by on October 9, 2013 in beets, carrots, celeriac, Fall recipes, kitchen, local, organic, real food, recipes | 1 comment

Fall Vegetable Favorites

I have been lagging on my posting due to a camera technical error – I was picking it up in a hurry one day, and it got caught on a drawer knob and was pulled from my hand.  It fell 2 feet to the hard ground and has been having a bit of trouble ever since.  So – a quick recipe!  This is what I ate for dinner last night.  Just this, and nothing else.  Maple-Roasted Root Vegetables (These are just the veggies I used last night, but you can use virtually any of the vegetables I list in the paragraph following the recipe.) 8 carrots 10 mini beets, or about 5 larger ones 2 bulbs of celeriac 1/2 stick butter 3 tbsp maple syrup sprinkle of sea salt Chop the root veggies into about 1/2 inch thick pieces.  Put them into a roasting pan – we used an 8.5×11 cake pan.  Slice the butter and spread it out evenly on top of the veggies.  Lightly drizzle the vegetables with maple syrup, and sprinkle them with a little sea salt.  Cover in foil, and roast in the over at 400 for about 40 minutes. Fall might be my favorite meal time of the year – sweet potatoes, squash, beets, carrots, turnips, apple, oh my!  Crunchy greens.  Pumpkin soup.  And here at Finn Meadows it means bacon and sausage!  Marc is currently in the kitchen fixing up some sage sausage; we’ve got some homemade apple sauce from the cult favorite variety, Northern Spy (also my favorite!).  We’re about to make a delicious salad with our asian greens mix.  I am completely and utterly addicted to this salad mix that we carry – I will sit down with a bowl of it, eat it quicker than I realize, then look down only to discover an empty bowl.  I have to refill it.  I continue to refill it until I eat an entire bag, and at that point it seems that going back to the barn to refill a bag might be taking it a little too far.  Point being: try the asian greens mix, especially if you like spicy.  It is amazing.  (I’m not the only one who thinks so – Montgomery Market people love it too!) What fall-inspired meals have you been cooking...

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The Alien Vegetable

Posted by on June 13, 2013 in Fall recipes, herbs, kohlrabi, recipes, Spring recipes | 1 comment

The Alien Vegetable

A lot of people have been asking about the weird looking, purple alien vegetable we’ve been selling.  Kohlrabi!  I do think it looks like an alien.  They also come in light green.  Kohlrabi is a cole crop (aka brassica) which makes it related to broccoli and cabbage.  Marc thinks it tastes like a broccoli stem.  I love it crispness, and once heard it described as tasting like a mix between a cucumber and a cabbage.  Apparently it is of German origin – a “cabbage turnip”.  In Germany it is cooked and served in a cream based sauce, but I personally like it raw.  I have been pretty obsessed with making a kohlrabi and radish slaw this week: Kohlrabi and Radish Slaw 2 kohlrabi, leaves removed and purple skin peeled, then chopped 8 radishes, chopped 3 tbsp olive oil 1 tbsp apple cider or red wine vinegar splash of lemon juice salt and pepper to taste spoonful of honey or other sweetener to balance the acid in your dressing chopped dill and chives* You can separately mix your vinaigrette, but I just dumped it all in a bowl and stirred it well.  Enjoy Kohlrabi while you can, it is only in season for another week or so until fall!   For more info and recipes, check out the NY Times Well Blog.  You can also follow us on Pinterest.  We’ll be updating the blog with recipes when we have the time, so if you have any you’d like to see, just send me an email. *Did you know about our herb garden? It is on the south side of the barn near the parking area.  CSA members are welcome to pick herbs FOR FREE.  Herbs are ~$20/lb in the grocery store…so please help yourself!...

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